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Putnam County Agriculture & Farmland Protection Board


  • Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board

    Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board:

    The Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board (PCAFPB) was formed in 1997 to advise the County legislature on actions that impact farms, and review Agricultural District petitions submitted during the Annual Enrollment period of April 1st through April 30th.  The PCAFPB shall also develop, assess, and approve county agricultural and farmland protection plans.  The PCAFPB is a resource for farmers, landowners, and municipalities regarding any agricultural concerns within Putnam County.

    If you are planning to petition to have your property included in the Putnam County Agricultural District, the PCAFPB strongly advises that you meet with the board prior to submitting your Annual Enrollment form to the County Legislature.  Meeting with the PCAFPB will ensure a thorough understanding of your property and farm operation.  This will then assist the PCAFPB in the review process and recommendation to the County Legislature.

    Our Mission:

    To support and promote the economic viability of agriculture while protecting the environment.

    Board Members:

    The PCAFPB consists of six (6) farmers, and representatives from each of the following agencies; Putnam County Legislature, Department of Planning, Development, and Public Transportation, Real Property Tax Services Agency, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County.

    Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District provides staff assistance to the PCAFPB, which meets monthly and oversees the official Agricultural District.

    Board Meeting Schedule:

    PCAFPB meets on the last Wednesday of every month at 10:15am at the Department of Planning, Development, and Public Transportation: 841 Fair Street, Carmel, NY 10512.

    If you would like to attend one of the monthly meetings, please call or email to confirm the regularly scheduled meeting will be taking place.”

    Contact information:

    Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board
    C/o Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District
    841 Fair Street
    Carmel, NY 10512
    Phone: (845) 878-7918
    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Farmers Market Information

    Farmers Market Brochure

    Click on the above link to see our to see the Putnam County Local Food Guide. Here you will find a list of all Putnam County’s Farmers Markets and Farm Stands. Each section will provide you with their location, phone number, days and hours of operation, and their affiliate websites.”

     

    (New) Hudson Valley Reginal Farmers Market

    15 Mt. Ebo Road So. (off Rte. 22)

    Brewster, NY 10509

    Every Sunday 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

    HudsonValleyFarmersMarket.org

  • Opportunities and Challenges

    Challenges identified by Putnam County farmers include:

    • Lack of recognition by local municipalities and the County of agriculture as an industry for economic development and tourism.
    • Lack of industry support for small farms, (i.e., needed capital, farm products and equipment repairs).
    • Limited availability of farmland for expansion of existing farms or for farmers wanting to begin farming in Putnam County.
    • Costs incurred by farmers of doing business in the County versus the level of income generated by farming activities.
    • Lack of a cohesive farmers’ network that provides opportunities for farmers to collaborate with each other and regionally helping to make their operations more efficient.
    • Lack of understanding by residents of the challenges faced by farmers that can lead to disputes with neighbors.
    • Lack of an integrated marketing plan to promote local products and benefits of agriculture.

    The Keep Putnam Farming program will work with Putnam County farmers to determine existing economic trends in the County and how this data can be used to better inform community planning efforts.

  • Collaborating Organizations & Agencies

    Putnam County and Glynwood have partnered to bring this initiative to Putnam County along with the following agencies:

    Collaborating Organizations and Agencies

    • Putnam County Agriculture and Farmland Protection Board
    • Putnam County Soil & Water Conservation District
    • Putnam County Planning Department
    • Putnam County Department of Health
    • Putnam County Economic Development Corporation
    • Putnam County Tourism
    • Putnam County Executive
    • Putnam County Legislature
    • USDA
    • Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County
    • Town Representatives
    • Community Representatives
  • Agriculture & Farmland Protection Plan 2004

  • Putnam County Country Fest

    *2024 Country Fest dates TBD*

Agricultural District Information

What is an Agricultural District?

An agricultural district is a geographic area consisting predominantly of viable agricultural land. Agricultural operations within the district are the priority land use and afforded benefits and protections to promote the continuation of farming and the preservation of agricultural land. In Putnam County we have one Agricultural District #1 that covers the entire county due to its small size; it didn’t make sense to have multiple agricultural districts. So instead of covering a defined land area, our agricultural district is parcel by parcel.

Putnam County has designated the month of April as the annual period during which landowners may request tax parcel inclusion into our Agricultural District.

During this process, parcels of land may be added; no tax parcels can be removed. The only time that tax parcels may be removed is during the NYS required programmatic eight-year review of the entire agricultural district. The Putnam County Agricultural District was created in 2003 and went through an eight-year review in 2011 and again in 2019. The next review is scheduled for April 2027.


Agricultural District Fact Sheet

Agricultural District Law:

The constitution of the State of New York directs the state legislature to provide for the protection of agricultural lands.  It is the purpose of the Agricultural Districts Law to provide a locally-initiated mechanism for the protection and enhancement of New York State’s agricultural land as a viable segment of the local and state economies and as an economic and environmental resource of major importance.

Enacted in 1971, New York’s Agricultural Districts Law (Article 25AA of New York State Agriculture and Markets Law)(AML) is a very effective tool for maintaining lands in agriculture and ensuring New York’s position as an outstanding agricultural state.  The Agricultural Districts Law recognizes that agricultural lands are important and irreplaceable resources, which are in jeopardy of being lost as a result of increasing cost of agricultural businesses, development pressures and regulatory constraints.  The Law seeks to create economic and regulatory incentives which encourage farmers to continue farming.  Relying primarily on the initiative of landowners and local governments, with state oversight, the law provides agricultural landowners with a number of benefits and protections.

Agricultural Districts Law and Local Regulations:

New York State Agricultural District Law protects farm operations within an agricultural district from the enactment and administration of unreasonably restrictive local regulations unless it can be shown that public health and safety is threatened.  It is important to note that Agricultural Districts does not give a farm owner any as-of-right exemption or waiver from local regulations.  Rather, the Agricultural District Law provides farm owners within an agricultural district assistance from the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets in instances in which the farmer believes that local regulatory requirements are unreasonably restricting the farm operation.  The NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets evaluates the reasonableness of a specific requirement or process imposed on a farm operation on a case-by-case basis and works with both the farm owner and the municipality to achieve the best solution possible.  The Commissioner of Agriculture and Markets does, however, have the authority to institute an action or compel a municipality to comply with this provision of the Agricultural Districts Law.  In such instances, the municipality must demonstrate that the regulation or requirement is necessary for the protection of public health and safety.  The NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets has developed guidelines on the effect of Agricultural Districts Law AML 25AA, §305-a on enactment and administration of local laws and regulations.  In particular, the Guidelines for Review of Local Zoning and Planning Laws guidance document provides valuable information on a variety of local regulatory issues.  These documents are updated periodically and may be obtained from the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets at https://agriculture.ny.gov/ and Ag District page at https://agriculture.ny.gov/land-and-water/agricultural-districtsand restrictive laws page at https://agriculture.ny.gov/land-and-water/section-305-review-restrictive-laws

Agricultural Districts Law and Local Planning:

State certified agricultural districts and county agricultural and farmland protection plans are community shaping influences in much the same way as existing and proposed infrastructure; wetlands, floodplains; topographical features; cultural, historic, and social amenities; economic needs; etc. are viewed.  The Agricultural Districts law is a valuable planning tool to conserve, protect, and encourage the development and improvement of the agricultural economy; protect agricultural lands as valued natural and ecological resources; and preserve open space.  In addition to AML Article 25AA, §305-a, limitations on local authority in Town Law §283-a and Village Law §7-739 were enacted to ensure that agricultural interests are taken into consideration during the review of specific land use proposals.  Town Law §283-a (1) and Village Law §7-739 (1), as amended by chapter 331 of the Laws of 2002, require local governments to “…exercise their powers to enact local laws, ordinances, rules or regulations that apply to farm operations in contravention of the purposes of article twenty-five-AA of the agriculture and markets law, unless it can be shown that the public health or safety is threatened.” These amendments make the Town and Village Law provisions consistent with AML section 305-a regarding showing a threat to the public health or safety.  AML §305-a, subdivision 1 is not a stand-alone requirement for coordination of local planning and land use decision making with the agricultural districts program.  Rather, it is one that is fully integrated with the comprehensive planning, zoning and land use review process.

https://agriculture.ny.gov/

Agricultural Districts Law and Property Ownership Disclosure:

  • 310 of the Agricultural Districts Law requires that when any purchase and sale contract is presented for the sale, purchase, or exchange of real property located partially, or wholly within an agricultural district, the prospective grantor shall present to the prospective grantee a disclosure notice which states the following:

“It is the policy of this state and this community to conserve, protect and encourage the development and improvement of agricultural land for the production of food, and other products, and also for its natural and ecological value.  This disclosure notice is to inform prospective residents that the property they are about to acquire lies partially or wholly within an agricultural district and that farming activities occur within the district.  Such farming activities may include, but not be limited to, activities that cause noise, dust, and odors.  Prospective residents are also informed that the location of property within an agricultural district may impact the ability to access local municipal water and/or sewer services for such property under certain circumstances.”

https://agriculture.ny.gov/land-and-water/sound-agricultural-practices

Agricultural District Annual Enrollment Process and Procedures

Agricultural District Annual Enrollment Process and Procedures:

Putnam County has an annual enrollment period for viable farmland to be considered for inclusion into the Putnam County Agricultural District #1.  During the month of April, landowners can petition to have their viable farmland enrolled into the County Agricultural District by filling out the Putnam County Annual Enrollment Form and submitting it to the Putnam County Legislature.  The submitted form(s) will then be reviewed by the Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board (PCAFPB) and Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District during the month of May.  As part of the review process a farm visit will also occur during the month of May.  The PCAFPB by AML Article 25AA is charged with determining whether the land to be included in the agricultural district consists predominantly of “viable agricultural land” as defined in §301. – 7 of AML Article 25AA and the inclusion of such land would serve the public interest by assisting in maintaining a viable agricultural industry within the agricultural district.  Once the PCAFPB has completed their review, the entire board will vote and then provide their recommendations to the County Legislature’s Physical Services Committee.

The county legislature’s Physical Services Committee reviews the PCAFPB’s recommendations and moves their decision to the full Legislative Board (landowners are encouraged to attend this meeting in case there are concerns or questions regarding the tax parcels). Prior to the full Legislature Board vote a public hearing is held (again landowners are encouraged to attend in case there are concerns or questions).

After the full Legislature Board votes on either to adopt or reject the inclusion of land parcels that petitioned to be included in Putnam Agricultural District #1, a letter, maps, and county resolution is then sent to the Commissioner of the NYS Agriculture and Markets for certification.  Once certified by NYS Agriculture and Markets, the tax parcels immediately become part of the County Agricultural District #1.

NYS Agriculture and Markets required programmatic eight-year review requires the county to contact all property owners within the agricultural district letting them know they need to re-petition to be in the agricultural district.  Each landowner needs to fill out the Putnam County Annual Enrollment Form and follow the procedures listed above otherwise they will no longer be in the agricultural district. You must do that even if you haven’t been in the agricultural district for the entire 8 years.

Preparation for petitioning to be included into the Putnam County Agricultural District #1 Check List:

  • Do you feel you have viable agricultural land that produces a viable income? If so please review AML Article 25AA   (For an equine operation Article 25AA requires that you have 7 acres in equine use, 10 horses and $10,000 in gross income).
  • Have you developed a business plan to be submitted with your enrollment form?
  • We highly recommend that you attend a Agriculture and Farmland Protection Board meeting to discuss you farm operation.
  • Submit you Agricultural District Enrollment Form and Business Plan to the Putnam County Legislature during the month of April.
Agricultural District Time Line

How long will the process take?

New York State has AML, Article 25-AA outlined a process that will take 180 days from the beginning of the 30-day submission period (April). With the enrollment window beginning April 1st, the completion of the entire process is anticipated to be October 1st, but will be dependent on Board meeting and public hearing dates.

How will landowners be informed throughout the process?

  • If anything is missing from your enrollment packet or if the PCAFPB requires additional information, it will contact the landowner by email.
  • The landowner will be contacted by email to set up a farm visit during the month of May.
  • Landowners will be contacted by email of the PCAFPB’s recommendation and date for the County Legislature’s Physical Services Committee Meeting date to allow landowners to attend. (Landowners can also check on the County website at http://www.putnamcountyny.com/legi/legislative-calendar/ to see the date of meetings as well)
  • Landowners will be notified by email of the County Legislature’s decision for inclusion or rejection.
  • Landowners will be notified by letter after the County has received certification form NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Can Putnam County’s Agricultural District change?

Putnam County’s Agricultural District was created in 2003 as a county-wide district. The agricultural district was re-certified in 2011 and again in 2019. The next scheduled state required programmatic review will be in 2027. At that time parcels wishing to remain in the agricultural district must re-apply. A reminder will be sent out to Putnam County Agricultural District members. During the NYS eight – year review is the only time that parcels can be removed from the agricultural district.

Timeline as outlined in NYS Agricultural District Law Article 25-AA:

Day Action
1 to 30 Open period for Annual Enrollment to petition for inclusion into the Putnam County Agricultural District #1. Landowners send in completed Annual Enrollment Forms to the Putnam County Legislature.

 

31 to 61 All requests are reviewed by the Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board (PCAFPB).  Site visits to each farm occur prior to the PCAFPB’s recommendations are submitted to the Putnam County Legislature. The PCAFPB then notifies landowners of their recommendations.

 

62 to 150 The Putnam County Legislature’s Physical Services Committee reviews and discussed the submitted Enrollment Forms and the PCAFPB’s recommendations.  The Committee then sends their decision onto the full Legislature.  A Public Hearing is held and the Full Legislature Board either adopts, rejects, or amends the PCAFPB’s recommendations.  After adoption, the Legislature will submit their resolution, the PCAFPB report, the Tax Parcel ID numbers, and maps to the Commissioner of the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.  The PCAFPB notifies landowners of the Legislature’s Physical Services Committee’s decision.

 

151 to 180 The Commissioner of the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets may certify the new parcels and on that day these parcels become part of Putnam County’s Agricultural District #1.

 

181 to 211 PCAFPB will notify landowners of their inclusion into the Putnam County Agricultural District #1.
Agricultural Assessment and Agricultural Districts What are the Differences?

We often get phone calls from landowners with questions about Ag Assessment and Ag Districts. These two programs are designed to help keep farmland in viable, commercial agricultural production, but they work very differently. One program provides financial incentives for agricultural use, through tax relief. The other provides protections from regulations and nuisance law-suits for landowners who are engaged in activities that are associated with agricultural production.

The Agricultural Assessment Program, established under the Agriculture & Markets Law (AML) Article 25-AA § 305, allows active farmland to receive a reduced assessment for property tax purposes – resulting in a partial exemption from real property taxes. Farmland qualifying for this reduction in assessed value does not have to be enrolled in an Agricultural District. Any owner of at least seven acres of land which produces a minimum of $10,000 annually, or any owner of less than seven acres of land which produces a minimum of $50,000 annually, on average in the preceding two years, from the sale of crops, agri-tourism events, beekeeping, livestock, or livestock products, riding academy or from a commercial equine operation, is eligible to receive an agricultural assessment. The program only applies to the land, not buildings or homesteads.

The Agricultural Assessment Program establishes a ceiling value for taxable assessments on eligible farmland. The local assessor is provided with State Certified ceiling values every year. Any assessed value which exceeds the agricultural assessment is exempt from Real Property taxation. Landowners must file an application annually, usually by March 1, with the local assessor to be considered for the Agricultural Assessment Program. Failure to file the application on time will result in denial of the exemption.

An agricultural district is a geographic area which consists of predominantly viable agricultural land. Districts may include land that is actively farmed, idle, forested, as well as land for residential and commercial uses. The Agricultural District Program, was established under AML § 303. It provides agricultural landowners a number of benefits and protections not associated with property tax relief, which encourage farmers to continue farming.

The Agricultural District Law protects farm operations within an agricultural district from the enactment and administration of unreasonably restrictive local regulations unless it can be shown that public health or safety is threatened. Under AML § 308, known as the ‘Right to Farm’ law, if a question or dispute arises regarding farm practices that may threaten public health or safety, an opinion can be requested of the Commissioner of NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets as to whether or not sound agricultural practices are being followed. Enrollment in an Agricultural District does not automatically qualify the property for the Agricultural Assessment Program.

For more information on NYS Ag Assessment, see the New York State Department of Revenue site: http://www.tax.ny.gov/research/property/assess/valuation/agindex.htm

For more information on NYS Ag District Program, see the New York State Department of Ag and Markets site: https://agriculture.ny.gov/land-and-water/agricultural-districts

Differences at a Glance

Agricultural Assessment Program

  • Provides property tax reduction on farmland
  • Property does not have to be in an agricultural district to qualify
  • Owner must file application annually with local assessor; usually no later than March 1
  • Minimum 7 acres in active farm production and proof of minimum $10,000 gross annual income from farming
  • If less than 7 acres, $50,000 gross income minimum
  • Property annually committed to agricultural use for minimum of 8 years if not in an agricultural district; 5 years if in an agricultural district
  • Property subject to payback of saved property tax dollars if land is converted to non-agricultural use within committed period and possible penalty if there is a failure to notify the assessor of the conversion within 90 days.
  • Land in agricultural production and rented to farmer may qualify
  • Eligibility determined by local assessor based upon State law specifications
  • Assessed agricultural value based upon State certified land classifications

https://www.tax.ny.gov/research/property/assess/valuation/ag_overview.htm

Agricultural District Program

  • Provides certain protections for agricultural land (does not include a tax reduction)
  • Land may or may not qualify for Agricultural Assessment Program
  • Districts are reviewed every eight years
  • Owner must apply for Ag District designation during established review period
  • Annual window for inclusion available for certain types of agricultural land
  • All applications for annual inclusion must be filed between during the annual window in the County. Contact the County Soil and Water Conservation office or Cornell Cooperative Extension for information on application process.
  • Applications reviewed by the County Agriculture and Farmland Protection Board and subject to approval of County Legislature and State Commissioner of Agriculture and Markets

https://agriculture.ny.gov/land-and-water/agricultural-districts

Local contacts:

Neal Tomann, District Manager

Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District

(845) 878-6331 x 40170 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 Patricia McLoughlin, Director

Putnam County Real Property Tax Services Agency

(845) 808-1030 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NYS Agriculture and Markets LawAgricultural Districts Law Article 25AA

Important Contact information:

Frequently Asked Questions

Does the agricultural district impact property taxes?

No. The agricultural districts do not affect your property taxes.  Agricultural lands may qualify for a tax break through the agricultural value assessment program.  Though agricultural value assessments and agricultural districts are governed by the same law, the process is completely independent.  Your taxes are based on the current land use and are determined by your town assessor independent of the agricultural district.  Your taxes will not automatically increase if your property is removed from the district nor will your taxes decrease for being in the agricultural district.

Tax benefits can occur in a few ways.  Land already with an agricultural value assessment – land with a property tax break because a farm meets sales and size requirements – can have this assessment for five years and convert to a non-agricultural use without incurring a penalty, as opposed to having to reach the normal eight years.  Also, land in agricultural production and in an agricultural district cannot have benefits assessments, special ad valorem levies, or other rates and fees for financing improvements such as water, sewer or non-farm drainage constructed on it, unless such charges were already imposed prior to the land being in an agricultural district.

Is the agricultural District part of zoning?

No. The agricultural district is not the same as zoning.  Zoning is local land use regulations.  Land in a certified agricultural district is in a New York State program to encourage the use of land for farming.  Officially, land in an agricultural district is in a New York State Certified Agricultural District.

Local Laws and Agricultural Districts - How do they relate?

Local governments, when exercising their powers to enact and administer comprehensive plans and local laws, ordinances, rules or regulations, shall exercise these powers in such manner as may realize the policy and goals set forth in this article (Article 25AA of the Agriculture and Markets Law), and shall not unreasonably restrict or regulate farm operations within agricultural districts in contravention of the purposed of this article unless it an be shown that the public health and safety is threatened.  Town Law, Village Law, General City Law and the Agricultural Districts Law are designed to encourage coordination of local planning and land use decision making with the agricultural districts program.

Does the agricultural district restrict me from doing certain things on my land?

No. The agricultural district doesn’t put any restrictions on what you can do to the land.  It does not prevent you from developing your land into residential or commercial uses in the future.  Its main goal is to provide protections for current and potential agricultural lands and to encourage agriculture to continue.  You may build new structures on land in the agricultural district, following the same process as lands outside of the agricultural district.

Do agricultural Districts prohibit selling land?

No. Being in an agricultural district does not prohibit the selling of land.  New York State Agricultural District Law (ADL) does not restrict the transfer of real property.  The ADL does provide for a real estate transfer disclosure by the seller to the prospective purchaser.  The discloser states if the property is located within an agricultural district and if farming activities including noise, dust and odors occur within the district.  Prospective residents are also informed if the location of the property within an agricultural district may impact the ability to access water and/or sewer services.

If my land is in an agricultral district, do I automatically receive benefits

No. Only land considered by the State to be a “Farm Operation” receives the benefits. (See definition on NYS Agriculture and Markets Article 25AA – Agricultural District Excerpts page)

Where can I find out is my property is in an agricultural disrict?

Call the Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District, Putnam County Real Property Tax Services Agency, or the town’s Tax Assessor.

What is an agricultural district review?

Districts are usually reviewed, or renewed, every eight years.  The Putnam County Legislature, after receiving the “renewal” packet from NYS Agriculture and Markets requests the PCAFPB to initiate a review of the entire agricultural district.  Once PCAFPB completes its review and submits its recommendations to the County Legislature, a public hearing is held to determine whether the district shall be continued, terminated or modified.  During the review process, land may be added or removed from the district.

Do non-farming residents benefit from an agricultural district?

Everyone benefits.  Besides its value for the production of food, agricultural land provides many environmental benefits including groundwater recharge, working open space, and scenic viewsheds.  Agricultural benefits local economies too, by providing on-farm jobs and supporting agribusiness.  Agricultural land requires fewer public services than developed land and results in cost savings for local communities.

Does an agricultural district gurantee a farmer's "right to farm"?

Yes and No. The New York State Agricultural District Law protects “Farm Operations” within an agricultural district from the enactment and administration of unreasonably restrictive local regulations unless it can be shown that public health and safety is threatened.  NYS Agriculture and Markets evaluates the reasonableness of a specific requirement or process on a farm operation on a case-by-case basis.  The NYS Agriculture and Markets Commissioner may institute an action or compel a municipality to comply with this provision of the New York State Agricultural District Law.

Does and agricultural district preserve farmland?

No. they do not preserve farmland in the sense that the use of the land is restricted to agricultural production forever.  Rather, districts provide benefits that help make and keep farming as a viable economic activity, thereby maintaining land in active agricultural use.

Can government acquire or condemn farmland within an agricultural district against a landowner's wishes?

The New York State Agricultural District Law (ADL) does not supersede a local government’s right to acquire land for essential public facilities like roads.  However, the ADL provides a process which requires a full evaluation of the effects of government acquisitions on the retention and enhancement of agriculture and agricultural resources within a district.

Who bears the cost of the agricultural assessment benefit?

Property taxes saved by farmers as a result of agricultural assessments must ultimately be made up by all taxpayers in the affected municipality.  However, farmers, as with other homeowners, must bear their fair share, since their residences are not subject to an agricultural assessment.  Keep in mind  their agricultural land does not require as much local services.

Videos

Putnam County Agriculture Roundtable:
A meeting for Farmers and Decision makers

Farms are small businesses that have some rules that protect their practices. We will discuss how local government and farms can co-exist as good business partners, protecting quality of life and providing locally grown products and farm experiences. We will shine a light on some misconceptions about Agricultural Districts, protected practices, local zoning and rules, and state laws. We will round out the discussion with our agricultural neighbors in Dutchess County to learn about two problem-solving practices. Please see the webinar on the link below.

Conversation with Farmers:

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County hosted a program with 5 Putnam County Famers including the host farm. They wanted to address the misconception that there are no farms in Putnam County. Please click the link below to watch the program.

Ag in the Classroom:

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County conducted Ag in the Classroom to Putnam County elementary school youth as part of the Ag Literacy Week. Ag in the Classroom is a partnership between Farm Bureau, NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, and Cornell University. Please click on the link below to watch the program.

Putnam County Office Building

40 Gleneida Avenue
Carmel, New York 10512

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